2012 Chevrolet Orlando images

•February 11, 2011 • Leave a Comment

Chevrolet Orlando

Chevrolet Orlando

Chevrolet Orlando

Chevrolet Orlando

Chevrolet Orlando

A thousand things to do in a day. Fun, entertainment and relaxation for family and friends. That’s the vacation spirit Chevrolet has packed into its first ever European MPV. Like the Chevrolet models recently launched in other market sectors, it doesn’t follow convention. Chevrolet Orlando’s design – part MPV, part crossover – breaks the rules of a historically conservative segment; it makes a statement and stands out from the crowd.

Chevrolet’s new compact MPV brings swagger to the segment by adopting a bolder look with its low roofline and crossover inspired silhouette, while retaining the distinctive and recognizable Chevrolet ‘face’ depicted by the split radiator grille and bow-tie badge.

Based on the show car concept first seen in 2008, the Chevrolet Orlando is nevertheless a true family car for the times, combining 7-seater practicality, interior flexibility and generous load space.

“We’re confident the Orlando not only brings great value for money to the MPV class but at the same time something fresh – a certain function with attitude, as we put it,” says Wayne Brannon, president and managing director of Chevrolet Europe. “I believe it will also bring more new customers to the Chevrolet brand.”

“The new Chevrolet Orlando MPV has a key strategic role to play in Chevrolet’s continued product offensive in Europe as it kicks off an ambitious seven-product launch program over the next 15 months.”

Engines

Chevrolet’s latest powertrain offerings show the speed at which the company is developing and refining its engines. A number of new and significant engine developments are being introduced on both the 2011 model year Cruze and the Orlando.

At launch, Chevrolet Orlando customers will have a choice of three engines, one gasoline and two diesels. Each offers the latest in performance potential and fuel efficiency. All engines are transversely mounted 4-cylinder units with common features including double overhead camshafts, 16 valves and either multi-point fuel injection, or in the case of the diesels, common-rail technology.

All the engines are constructed with a cast-iron cylinder block and alloy head, where further weight savings have been achieved.

The single gasoline engine is a responsive, fuel-injected 1796cc unit which features variable valve timing for increased power output and torque over a wider engine speed range. Variable valve timing reduces emissions due to greater exhaust gas recirculation, and improves fuel consumption.

The 1.8 liter produces an impressive 141 hp at 6200rpm and strong pulling power with 176Nm of torque at 3800 rpm, 85% of which is available from 2000 rpm. Specific engine power per liter is 78.3. This normally aspirated 1.8 liter is also fuel efficient with consumption on a combined cycle at 7.3 liter/100km and emissions of 172g/km. It qualifies for Euro 5 emissions class.

Orlando’s maximum speed with the gasoline engine is 185kph with a 0 to 100kph time of 11.6 seconds when coupled with the standard 5-speed manual transmission.

Pulling power

The diesels are expected to be a popular choice among Orlando owners, and these engines benefit from a number of technical enhancements which are introduced on Chevrolet’s new entry. Both engines are of the same 1998cc displacement and share the same technology, but two power outputs are available.

The heart of each is a 16-valve, four-cylinder 2.0-liter engine with cast-iron block and aluminum head, which features a double overhead cam (DOHC). Chevrolet Orlando’s advanced common rail injection system; peak firing pressure within the combustion chamber is 180 bar pressure resulting in improved fuel economy and lower emissions.

Chevrolet’s refinements to the intake system include a ‘variable swirl’ intake manifold that improves performance characteristics for both versions of diesel engines.

In the case of the higher output version, peak power is 163 hp at 3800rpm while maximum torque is 360Nm at 2000rpm. For the standard output engine, both engine power and torque are 130 hp at 3800rpm and 315Nm at 2000rpm.

Mated to the standard 6-speed manual gearbox, performance figures for the Orlando with either version of the diesel engines are impressive. The 130 hp version has a top speed of 180kph and reaches 100kph from a standstill in 10.3 seconds. The 163 hp engine has a maximum speed of 195kph and reaches 100kph in 10.0 seconds.

In-gear times for the 163 hp engine are 12.2 seconds for acceleration between 40 and 100kph (4th gear) and 11.0 seconds for acceleration between 80 and 120kph (5th gear). Times for the 130 hp version are 12.7 seconds for in-gear acceleration from 40 to 100kph (4th gear) and 11.4 seconds between 80 and 120kph (5th gear).

Fuel economy and emissions figures are common to both engines at 6.0 liters/100km on a combined cycle with emissions of 159 g/km, making the engines Euro 5 compliant.

Joy of six

The 1.8-liter gasoline engine is fitted with a 5-speed manual transmission while both of the diesel engines have a six-speed box. However, the 163 hp high power version of the diesel is also available with Chevrolet’s six-speed automatic transmission.

This auto transmission features sophisticated electronics and adaptive shifting control as well as widely spaced ratios with a short first gear to ensure efficient take-off from standstill and long top gear for maximum fuel economy on the open road.

The Orlando diesel auto demonstrates some great mid-range thrust, as the official performance figures confirm: the in-gear acceleration figures for 40 to 100ph are just 9.0 seconds while the time for 80 to 120kph is 8.4 seconds; 0 to 100kph is 11.0 seconds.

As is to be expected from an automatic transmission, fuel economy and emissions are marginally increased over the manual at 7.0 liters/100km and 186 g/km.

Chevrolet Orlando customers will have a choice of engine and trim combinations. So, for example, the 1.8 gasoline will be available with all trims; the 2.0 130 hp diesel will be available on LS and LT trims; the higher-powered 163 hp version, with either manual or automatic transmission, can be ordered with LT and LTZ trim options.

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Acura TL (2012)

•February 10, 2011 • Leave a Comment

Acura TL (2012)

Acura TL (2012)

Acura TL (2012)

In addition, the transmission teams with a new multi-clutch torque converter that not only reduces heat build-up during operation, but also allows for lock-up activation during a much wider range of driving conditions — which helps generate improved fuel economy. As a result, city/highway fuel economy is now 20/29 mpg — an increase of 3 mpg in highway driving over the 2011 TL. To further improve operating efficiency, the Acura TL’s standard 3.5L V-6 engine receives a host of friction-reduction technologies while a revised air inlet system provides cooler air for both the 3.5L and 3.7L engines.

For 2012, two distinct versions of Acura’s performance luxury sedan remain: a 280 horsepower, front-wheel-drive TL along with a powerful 305 hp Acura TL paired with Acura’s exclusive Super Handling All-Wheel Drive™ (SH-AWD™). The performance-minded 6MT model will continue to be offered in the 2012 Acura TL SH-AWD lineup, helping broaden the Acura TL’s appeal among luxury performance sedan buyers.

Both the TL and TL SH-AWD™ models offer an available Technology Package which includes the Acura Navigation System with Voice Recognition™, AcuraLink Real-Time Traffic with Traffic Rerouting™ and AcuraLink Real-Time Weather™, and an Acura/ELS Surround® 410-watt Premium Audio System. For 2012, the hard disk drive (HDD) based navigation system increases in size to 60 gigabytes, map coverage is more expansive, USB connection speed is faster, and the full VGA monitor is brighter with even richer colors. Also available is a new Advance Package that incorporates all-new ventilated front seats along with a new blind spot information (BSI) system that alerts the driver of other vehicles that are in close proximity.

Standard on the 2012 Acura TL are new 17×8-inch 7-spoke aluminum wheels with P245/50R17 all-season tires for confident year-round performance. The Acura TL SH-AWD® comes standard with new 18×8-inch 5-spoke aluminum wheels with low-profile P245/45R18 tires for more agile handling. Finally, when equipped with the available Advance Package, the Acura TL comes with 18×8-inch 5-spoke wheels while TL SH-AWD™ is fitted with 19×8-inch split five-spoke aluminum wheels with new performance minded P245/40R19 all-season tires.

Along with every new Acura, the new 2012 TL is covered by a comprehensive 4-year/50,000 mile bumper-to-bumper limited warranty and a 6-year/70,000 miles powertrain limited warranty. Additional benefits of ownership include Acura Total Luxury Care® (TLC®), which provides free 24-hour roadside assistance, concierge service and trip routing.

Acura TL (2012)

Acura TL (2012)

Honda CR-Z images

•February 9, 2011 • Leave a Comment

Honda CR-Z

Honda CR-Z

Honda CR-Z

Honda CR-Z

Honda CR-Z



t’s tempting to think of the CR-Z hybrid as the second coming of the CRX, Honda’s light, tossable mid-1980s funster, what with the two cars’ stubby rear ends, two-seat layouts, and frugal intentions. At the CR-Z launch, in fact, Honda plopped us down in a cherry 1985 CRX Si and told us to go nuts. We did, and we’re sorry, Big H, but the CR-Z just isn’t quite as awesome.

Where the impish CRX used lightness and a stripped-down approach to deliver entertainment and efficiency, the CR-Z looks to a gasoline-electric hybrid powertrain. The difference between the two paths is stark, or so goes conventional wisdom. With less weight and simplicity come fun and momentum-style hoonage, and with a hybrid powertrain comes, well, soul-crushing dullness. Somewhat shockingly, however, this hybrid is entertaining, even as it tries to marry the disparate concepts of sport and efficiency.

Nowhere is that conflict more evident than in the two transmissions. Opt for the six-speed manual, and the CR-Z delivers perhaps the most transparent hybrid experience available today, because you control the shift points and how quickly the gears are changed. Particularly with the three-mode adjustable drive system in sport mode, it’s a relatively fun little car. But go for the CVT, as Honda expects 75 percent of buyers to do, and besides being a downer of a person, you lose any sense of joy and immediacy. In the CVT’s manual mode—actuated via standard paddle shifters—you can wind through seven fake ratios, but the “shifts” into those ratios are slurred and slow. Moreover, although the four-cylinder is never sonorous even with the stick, the CVT causes an unpleasant droning.

Heavy, Man

At 160.6 inches long, the CR-Z is 16 inches longer than the original CRX, but it doesn’t look like that much with the two cars side by side; for modern reference, the CR-Z is an inch shorter than Honda’s own Fit. It’s not as light, however, with Honda estimates putting the CR-Z around 2700 pounds. We measured the bigger Fit at 2500 pounds with a manual, and a CRX Si we tested 25 years ago weighed in at a svelte 1840. Of course, beyond the hybrid system, the CR-Z includes a boatload of stuff unavailable on the original CRX: airbags, a couple of decades’ worth of crash-worthiness improvements, and doors thicker than a Trapper Keeper, to mention a few. Still, from behind the wheel, you never shake the sense of extra weight.

At the heart of the CR-Z is the 1.5-liter four-cylinder from the Fit, here making 113 hp and 107 lb-ft of torque. It mates to Honda’s Integrated Motor Assist hybrid system as seen in the Insight, which is comprised of a nickel-metal hydride battery pack and a 13-hp electric motor. Combined output stands at 122 hp and 128 lb-ft of torque (123 lb-ft with the CVT). Acceleration isn’t scorching by any means, but the CR-Z doesn’t feel poky like the Fit or Insight. Helping foster that sense is the sport mode, activated via a button to the left of the steering wheel. In sport, throttle sensitivity is increased, the steering tightens, the electric motor provides more assistance on manual-equipped cars, and in CVT models, the “gear ratios” are optimized for acceleration. There are also normal and econ modes, and the latter dulls throttle response, retunes the CVT for fuel-economy gains, turns down the fan speed and minimizes compressor use for the A/C, and reduces power and torque by four percent except in wide-open-throttle situations.

The mileage returned by the CR-Z isn’t as stellar as you’d expect in a hybrid this small, at 31 mpg city and 37 mpg highway with a manual and 35/39 with the CVT. (The EPA tests were run in normal mode.) Would those numbers be the same if the car were lighter with no hybrid gadgetry? Let’s just say we got 32 mpg from that 1985 CRX Si. But before you start ranting about how disappointing the numbers are—“I’ve seen 167 mpg in my Prius! Uphill and into the wind! Rarghargh!”—remember that Honda has the Insight and upcoming Fit hybrid to appeal to the hypermiler crowd. The CR-Z is a sporty car with green leanings more than anything else, and that likely guided the engineers’ efficiency targets.

A Great Ride and More Steering Feel Than Expected

The chassis plays a big part in making the hybrid experience transparent. The brakes are a touch grabby, but they have only the slightest hint of hybrid-style sponginess, and the transition from regenerative to conventional braking is essentially seamless. The linearity of the brakes is good, too. The electrically boosted steering has more feel than we expected, and turn-in is eager in normal mode and quick in sport. Where the CR-Z impresses most is in ride quality. Generally, when something has the wheelbase of a Matchbox car, you can expect to be revectored as you hit midcorner bumps, plus a jarring, crashing ride—the sportiest Minis being prime examples. The CR-Z exhibits very little of such behaviors, though, with part of the credit going to the standard 16-inch wheels and relatively tall sidewalls of the 195/55 Dunlop SP Sport 7000 rubber. That’s not to say the CR-Z is firmly planted all the time. Pitch this Honda hard into a corner with stability control disabled and lift off the throttle, and the back will swing around (and quite quickly due to the short wheelbase), so you need to be ready to dial in some opposite lock. Blame the weight of the batteries, which live between the rear wheels. The handling would benefit from a firmer suspension—it would shore up slight body roll, for one thing—but at the expense of compliance. Such a strategy would certainly alienate a good chunk of buyers, a large majority of whom will find the current setup to be sporty enough.

The CR-Z comes in three flavors: base, EX, and EX with navigation. Honda says pricing will start under $20,000 with destination charges and top out at just below $24,000 when the car goes on sale in late August. (Update: Official pricing has been released. A base model will cost $19,950 and a top-spec EX with navigation and the CVT will be $23,960.) Standard across the range are stability control, power mirrors, power locks and windows, keyless entry, automatic climate control, cruise control, a tilting and telescoping steering column, USB and auxiliary inputs, LED taillamps, and the three-mode drive system. EX models get HID headlamps, fog lights, aluminum pedals, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, and an upgraded audio system with a subwoofer. The rear cargo area will accommodate a couple of golf bags with the rear bulkhead folded down and two suitcases with it up, not too bad considering the car’s diminutive size. To the CR-Z’s credit, too, it has the best interior among Honda’s cheaper offerings, with cloth door inserts, a soft-touch dash covering, and attractive switchgear. It’s certainly better than the cost-cut, hard-plastic-riddled cabin of the Insight.

Who Will Buy It?

We admit to wondering who’s going to buy this car. If fuel efficiency is the goal, better mileage (and practicality) can be found in the Toyota Prius and the Insight, which are EPA-rated for 50 and 41 mpg combined, respectively. And those in the market for an inexpensive sporty car can also shop the conventionally powered Mini Cooper and Scion tC, while perhaps pocketing some savings. The Mini in particular isn’t much off in efficiency, either, being rated as high as 32 mpg combined. Further, all those CVT buyers will effectively negate the CR-Z’s reason for being, its sportiness. Without that, you’re left with a less-efficient two-seat Insight that can’t carry as much stuff. Sounds dicey, even at Honda’s stated U.S. sales goal of 15,000 per year.

Meanwhile, we await word of a CR-Z Si. If it does happen, we’d prefer such a car to be created by ditching the hybrid stuff, which adds roughly $2000 to the cost of the regular CR-Z; further chassis tightening; and bumping the 1.5’s output by 20 hp and 20 or so lb-ft. Honda, on the other hand, appears to lean toward turning up the wick on the electric motor for an Si. At the very least, the base car shows that a desire to build fun-to-drive vehicles still exists within Honda. After the death of the S2000, the big-ification of the Accord, and the introduction of off-target vehicles like the Crosstour, we were beginning to have doubts. Still, it’s sad that this is the second-sportiest U.S. Honda behind the Civic Si, and you could argue that in making this car hybrid only—instead of making the hybrid powertrain an option—the company still is trying to be all things to all people, and that it would be better served focusing on what led its success in the first place: making stuff that’s great and not merely good. Ultimately, although the CR-Z can be good, it’s a compromise. And that’s a shame, because it could be even better.

 

2012 Audi A6 images

•February 8, 2011 • Leave a Comment

2012 Audi A6

2012 Audi A6

2012 Audi A6

2012 Audi A6

2012 Audi A6

Audi has redesigned its flagship executive class model. With its light body, sporty chassis and a wide array of new assistance and multimedia systems, the full-sized sedan is packed with innovative solutions in every area of technology. The range of available engines and drivetrains is equally extensive. Combining the power of a V6 with the fuel efficiency of a four-cylinder engine, the soon-to-be-available Audi A6 Hybrid will be one highlight of the lineup.

Much of the body of the new Audi A6 consists of aluminum and high-tech steels, rendering it exceedingly light, stiff and safe. State-of-the art design methods and materials ensure extremely low interior noise levels. Precision tuning of all components and systematic hydraulic damping in the axle and drivetrain bearings provide excellent vibrational comfort.

The design of the new Audi A6 embodies athleticism and elegance. The sedan is 4.92 meters (16.14 ft) long and 1.87 meters (6.14 ft) wide, but just 1.46 meters (4.79 ft) high – sporty proportions that are unrivaled by the competition. The long engine hood, the low, sweeping roofline and the prominent lines on the flanks create a dynamic overall appearance. Optional LED headlights emphasize the striking expression at the front.

The roomy interior of the new Audi A6 echoes the sinewy style of the exterior. The salient element is the “wrap-around” – an inlay encircling the driver and the front-seat passenger. The elegantly curved dash panel places the driver at the center of the interior.

Every detail of the interior is a testament to the care that Audi invests in carmaking. All materials, including an innovative layered-wood veneer, have been selected and crafted with the utmost care. As an option, the front seats can be equipped with ventilation and massage functions. Classy ambient lighting in the lighting package provides small points of light throughout the interior.

The new Audi A6 features the logical ergonomics concept that distinguishes all of the brand’s models. A highly efficient automatic air conditioning system and the latest-generation MMI radio operating system are standard; Audi also offers an optional head-up display, which projects important information onto the windshield. The MMI touch operating system is also available as an option. This enables much of the hard-drive MMI navigation plus system to be controlled by means of a touchpad.

The online services, developed though a partnership between Audi and service provider Google, connect the full-sized sedan to the Internet via the Bluetooth car phone online. A UMTS module pulls images and information from Google Earth up on the monitor and integrates them with the navigation route. A WLAN hotspot provides contact to mobile terminals on board. The top of the hi-fi line is the Bang & Olufsen Advanced Sound System.

MMI navigation plus works closely together with the optional assistance and safety systems in the new A6. It forwards the route data to the control units for the headlights, the automatic transmission and the adaptive cruise control with stop & go function. This enables these systems to recognize complex scenarios and assist the driver. In many situations, the Audi pre sense safety system is able to reduce accidents and their consequences, or even prevent them altogether. The Audi active lane assist helps the driver keep the Audi A6 on course, and the park assist system relieves the driver of the chore of steering when parallel parking.

Audi offers the A6 with a choice of five powerful, highly efficient engines: two gasoline engines and three TDI units. These powerplants develop between 130 kW (177 hp) and 220 kW (300 hp). All of these engines make use of important technologies from the brand’s modular efficiency platform – the start-stop system, the energy recovery system, and the innovative thermal management concept.

Throughout the entire model line, fuel consumption in the Audi A6 has decreased by up to 19 percent compared to the previous model. In terms of consumption figures, the Audi A6 outperforms the competition.

The most powerful unit in the range is the 2.0 TDI. In conjunction with a manual transmission, it requires on average just 4.9 liters of fuel per 100 km (48.00 US mpg) and emits just 129 g CO2 per km (207.61 g/mile). The Audi A6 hybrid will be available from Audi at a later date. Serving up 180 kW (245 hp) of system performance, its 2.0 TFSI plus electric motor will achieve efficient and sporty acceleration with an average fuel consumption of only 6.2 liters per 100 km (37.94 US mpg) (provisional figure).

As was the case with the previous model, the new Audi A6 is also available with a wide range of drivetrains. The choice, based on the engine version, will include a manual six-speed transmission, the continuously variable multitronic, and the brand-new, sporty S tronic. Each unit is precisely tuned and features a wide gear-ratio spread, thereby making a significant contribution to the sedan’s efficiency.

Depending on the engine version, power is funneled via the gears to the front wheels or to the quattro permanent all-wheel drive, whose crown-gear center differential and torque-vectoring function achieve the ultimate traction, stability and dynamic response. For the top-of-the-line engines, Audi will offer an optional sport differential.

The chassis of the new A6 combines sporty precision with supreme comfort. Its links are made of aluminum; the redesigned power steering features a highly efficient electromechanical drive. The executive sedan has wheels ranging from 16 to 20 inches in diameter.

The Audi drive select dynamic handling system is standard, and the front-wheel-drive models have the sporty ESP with electronic limited-slip differential on board. For enhanced comfort, adaptive air suspension with controlled damping is available as an option. Dynamic steering will be available soon, also as an option.

Acura TSX Sedan review

•February 5, 2011 • Leave a Comment

Acura TSX Sedan

Acura TSX Sedan

Acura TSX Sedan

Acura TSX Sedan

Acura TSX Sedan

Acura TSX Sedan

 

The 2010 TSX is available with a 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine or a 3.5-liter V6. The four-cylinder comes with a choice of manual or automatic transmission, while the V6 comes with an automatic. The four-cylinder is rated at 201 horsepower and just 172 pound-feet of torque but it revs happily and, with the six-speed manual, it’s the enthusiast’s choice; figure on 0-60 acceleration in the mid-seven-second range. Fuel economy, according to the federal government, for a TSX four-cylinder automatic is 21/30 mpg City/Highway.

The new V6 changes the character of the car. Acura’s V6 is smooth and linear, and up in the higher revs makes a pleasant growl. Good as the five-speed automatic is with paddles and a sport mode that holds manual gear selections, it hasn’t the involvement factor of the six-speed manual offered only with the four-cylinder. The V-6 model is heavier by 210 pounds and takes 3 mpg off EPA city and highway ratings. And it needs an extra 15 inches of space for a U-turn. The TSX V-6 gets an EPA-estimated 18/27 mpg.

The TSX uses front-wheel drive, whereas true sports sedans are rear-wheel drive. That said, the TSX is one of the better-handling front-wheel-drive sedans. And in its class it’s hard to beat as an everyday driver that can still be fun on a winding road. The 2.4-liter engine is rated at 201-hp,

Styling is true to Acura themes, the more aggressive, buff look to emphasize stance introduced on the 2009 model.


2011 Cadillac CTS-V Black Diamond Edition Review

•February 5, 2011 • Leave a Comment

2011 Cadillac CTS-V Black Diamond Edition

2011 Cadillac CTS-V Black Diamond Edition

2011 Cadillac CTS-V Black Diamond Edition

2011 Cadillac CTS-V Black Diamond Edition

2011 Cadillac CTS-V Black Diamond Edition

2011 Cadillac CTS-V Black Diamond Edition

In the Cadillac CTS-V Black Diamond, a dark tri-coat paint is embedded with SpectraFlair Bright Silver pigment. While other luxury makers offer metallic paints, Black Diamond is created through a meticulous process that gives the paint added dimension.

Instead of simply containing small bits of metal, the SpectraFlair pigment in Black Diamond uses aluminum flakes encapsulated in a glass-like substance called magnesium fluoride. The result is a paint that has a diamond-like sparkle as light hits the surface from different angles.

In addition to the unique paint, Cadillac CTS-V Black Diamond comes standard with content that complements its look and feel. The special edition has: Satin Graphite 19-inch wheels with yellow Brembo brake calipers. These six-piston front, four-piston back brake calipers provide exceptional stopping capabilities. Recaro seats that feature 14 adjustable elements, French-stitched leather and microfiber suede inserts in the center sections of the cushions and seatbacks. Midnight Sapele wood trim known for its durability and distinctive grain.

The CTS-V Black Diamond Edition joins Cadillac’s award-winning V-Series line of performance luxury vehicles. The CTS-V Sedan, Coupe and Wagon all feature a supercharged 6.2L V8 engine with 556-horspower, Magnetic Ride Control suspension that reads and reacts to the road 1,000 times a second and Michelin Pilot Sport PS2 tire.

The Cadillac CTS-V Black Diamond comes with a suggested retail price, including destination charges, of $69,190 for the manual or $70,490 for the automatic, a $4,850 premium over the CTS-V base price. The CTS-V Black Diamond will be available at U.S. dealerships in March 2011.

 

2011 ford explorer suv pictures

•February 5, 2011 • Leave a Comment

2011 ford explorer suv

2011 ford explorer suv

2011 ford explorer suv

2011 ford explorer suv

2011 ford explorer suv

Yesterday Ford officially took the wraps off the all-new 2011 Explorer and Ford has already launched the online configurator which details all the pricing.

The Explorer will be available in three trim levels: base, XLT and Limited.

Pricing:
-Base: $28,190 (FWD), $30,190 (AWD)
-XLT: $31,190 (FWD), $33,190 (AWD)
-Limited: $37,190 (FWD), $39,190 (AWD)

The 2011 Explorer can be powered by either the 290-hp 3.5L V6 or a new 237-hp 2.0L turbocharged 4-cyl. Pricing has yet to be released for the 4-cylinder, but it’s expected to be priced higher than the V6 powered Explorer.